Acupuncturist Program

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Acupuncturist Program

Acupuncture Program (3 year)

The focus of year one will be on the orientation into the paradigm of Chinese medicine. Following the introduction of fundamental theories and concepts the student will gradually be introduced to diagnosis, disease and treatment principles. The practical training will be focused on Taiji Quan. The study of the Chinese language is used to develop a deeper understanding of the fundamental concepts and to prepare the student for independent research of TCM manuscripts still in their language of origin, as well as preparation for possible further studies in China for those students who choose to do so.

Year 1 of the program is a particularly significant phase of the program in that students from diverse backgrounds and with diverse levels of knowledge will establish in themselves not only the actual detailed knowledge of TCM, but also a solid conceptualization of the medicine as a whole. In general, this involves a transition from the romantic view of TCM to the realism of the medicine as a science in its own right. With the study of western science initiated in tandem with that of TCM, students will begin to foster the integrated medicine approach advocated within the TCM profession today.

 

 

YEAR ONE: Term 1 – Fall (September Intake)

ACU102. Chinese Acupuncture I – Meridians (didactic) 4 credits. Meridian theory will be investigated with emphasis on study and citing from the classics in the Huangdi Neijing, Ling Shu and selected modern sources. Topics will include an introduction to the origin and development of the meridian system, introduction to the distribution and pathologies of the twelve regular meridians and eight extraordinary meridians; meridian gen-jie (root-branch), four seas, and six meridian diagnosis. Concurrent TCM101 (or prerequisite TCM111 and concurrent with TCM112), BMS197

BMS197. Western Anatomy & Physiology I (didactic) 4.5 credits. This foundational Western Medicine course provides a detailed study of the body’s skeletal and muscular systems, as well as, an introduction to basic biochemistry and cellular physiology as defined by allopathic medicine. Concurrent with BMS196 (for Dual Program)

CS109. Medical Mandarin I (didactic) 3 credits. An introduction to modern medical mandarin with a focus on grammar, character writing and character identification. Students will also learn how to use a Chinese language dictionary to look up commonly employed terms and characters, and are introduced to Chinese calligraphy. Prerequisite: none

CS157. Communication/Ethics/Body Landmarks (didactic & practical/simulated) 1.5 credits. This course will explore the ethics of therapeutic touch and the practitioner/patient relationship. Students will also identify and palpate major anatomical landmarks, as well as, meridian pathways. Prerequisite: none

PC106. Taiji Quan (practical) 2 credits. This practical course focuses on mastery of the twenty-four pose tai ji quan form. Prerequisite: none

TCM101. Foundations of TCM (didactic) 7 credits. General introduction to theory of TCM including the following: Yin and Yang; Qi; Five elements; Vital substances; Meridians and Luo vessels, manifestation of the internal organs, diseases and their etiology, pathology and patho-mechanism, prevention of disease, disease patterning, and therapeutic principles. This course will cover both modern and classical interpretations of these concepts. Prerequisite: none

TCM103. Chinese Nutrition – Nourishing Vitality Principles (didactic) 3 credits. This course offers discussion of nutrition and lifestyle from a TCM perspective. Daoist principles of food energetics, disease prevention, and living according to the seasons are central themes of this course. Constitution, environmental factors, and the properties and functions of whole foods are examined within the context of maintaining and restoring health. Prerequisite: none

TCM104. Introduction Chinese Herbology (didactic) 1 credit. This introductory course familiarizes the student with the origin, evolution, and basic principles of Chinese herbology. Concepts introduced include the Five flavours, Six Qi, Home Meridian, and Four Directions. Students will learn latin and pin yin names for commonly used medicinal herbs. Habitat and cultivation practices, dosage, administration, and potential toxicity are also studied. Prerequisite: none

Total Credits, Term 1: 26

 

 

YEAR ONE: Term 2 – Winter (September Intake)

ACU161. Chinese Acupuncture II – Acupoints (didactic) 7 credits. A complete study of the location, cross- sectional anatomy, function and indications, and acu-moxa of the 12 regular meridian points, Ren and Du meridian points, as well as extra points according to the modern standard, with emphasis on the most frequently used points. Students will also learn the various special point groupings as well as their functional significance and therapeutic uses and how to use point combinations for selected pathologies. Prerequisite: TCM151 (or concurrent)

ACU164. Acupuncture Lab I (practical) 2 credits. Practical hands-on location of acu-points on other students in the class. A primary focus of this course is cross-sectional anatomy. Students will be tested on nerves, vital organs, blood vessels, muscles, ligaments, bones, and other structures located at or near acu-points. TCM 151 (or concurrent) and adjunct and concurrent to course ACU161.

BMS198. Western Anatomy & Physiology II (didactic & practical) 4.5 credits. This foundational Western Medicine course provides a detailed study of the nervous, respiratory, digestive, urinary, reproductive, cardiovascular and lymphatic systems as well as basic genetic information. Concurrent with BMS199 (for Dual program)

CS159. Medical Mandarin II (didactic) 3 credits. A continuation of modern medical mandarin I with a focus on grammar, character writing and character identification. Students will also learn how to use a Chinese language dictionary to look up commonly employed terms and characters, and are introduced to Chinese calligraphy and classical medical writings. Prerequisite: CS109

CS167. Communication Skills I (didactic & practical/simulated) 2 credits. The study of principles and ethics of therapeutic counselling. This course will initiate the development of counseling skills required for the practice of a health practitioner. Focus is on self-study and methods of interaction. Prerequisite: none

TCM151. Diagnostics of TCM (didactic) 7 credits. Topic areas include: the four pillars of diagnosis: observation, osculation/olfaction, interrogation, and palpation with particular emphasis on tongue and pulse diagnosis; TCM differentiation of syndromes according to various models including Ba Gang (Eight Principles), Qi and Blood, Zang Fu, Meridians and Collaterals, Pathogens, Sanjiao or Three Levels, Four Stages and Liu Jing or Six Layers. Prerequisite: TCM101 (or concurrent with TCM111)

Total Credits, Term 2: 25.5

Year 1 September Intake Total Credits: 51.5
Year 1 September Intake Total Credit Hours: 772.5

 

YEAR ONE: Term 1 – Winter (January Intake)

ACU161. Chinese Acupuncture II – Acupoints (didactic) 7 credits. A complete study of the location, cross- sectional anatomy, function and indications, and acu-moxa of the 12 regular meridian points, Ren and Du meridian points, as well as extra points according to the modern standard, with emphasis on the most frequently used points. Students will also learn the various special point groupings as well as their functional significance and therapeutic uses and how to use point combinations for selected pathologies. Prerequisite: TCM151 (or concurrent)

ACU164. Acupuncture Lab I (practical) 2 credits. Practical hands-on location of acu-points on other students in the class. A primary focus of this course is cross-sectional anatomy. Students will be tested on nerves, vital organs, blood vessels, muscles, ligaments, bones, and other structures located at or near acu-points. TCM 151 (or concurrent) and adjunct and concurrent to course ACU161.

BMS198. Western Anatomy & Physiology II (didactic & practical) 4.5 credits. This foundational Western Medicine course provides a detailed study of the nervous, respiratory, digestive, urinary, reproductive, cardiovascular and lymphatic systems as well as basic genetic information. Concurrent with BMS199 (for Dual program)

CS157. Communication/Ethics/Body Landmarks (didactic & practical/simulated) 1.5 credits. This course will explore the ethics of therapeutic touch and the practitioner/patient relationship. Students will also identify and palpate major anatomical landmarks, as well as, meridian pathways. Prerequisite: none

CS167. Communication Skills I (didactic & practical/simulated) 2 credits. The study of principles and ethics of therapeutic counselling. This course will initiate the development of counseling skills required for the practice of a health practitioner. Focus is on self-study and methods of interaction. Prerequisite: none

TCM104. Introduction Chinese Herbology (didactic) 1 credit. This introductory course familiarizes the student with the origin, evolution, and basic principles of Chinese herbology. Concepts introduced include the Five flavours, Six Qi, Home Meridian, and Four Directions. Students will learn latin and pin yin names for commonly used medicinal herbs. Habitat and cultivation practices, dosage, administration, and potential toxicity are also studied. Prerequisite: none

TCM111. Foundations of TCM (lecture) 5 credits. General introduction to theory of TCM including the following: Yin and Yang; Qi; Five elements; Vital substances; Meridians and Luo vessels, manifestation of the internal organs, diseases and their aetiology, pathology and pathomechanism, prevention of disease, disease patterning, and therapeutic principles. This course will cover both modern and classical interpretations of these concepts. Prerequisite: none

TCM151. Diagnostics of TCM (didactic) 7 credits. Topic areas include: the four pillars of diagnosis: observation, osculation/olfaction, interrogation, and palpation with particular emphasis on tongue and pulse diagnosis; TCM differentiation of syndromes according to various models including Ba Gang (Eight Principles), Qi and Blood, Zang Fu, Meridians and Collaterals, Pathogens, Sanjiao or Three Levels, Four Stages and Liu Jing or Six Layers. Prerequisite: TCM101 (or concurrent with TCM111)

Total Credits, Term 1: 30

 

 

YEAR ONE: Term 2 – Summer (January Intake)

ACU102. Chinese Acupuncture I – Meridians (didactic) 4 credits. Meridian theory will be investigated with emphasis on study and citing from the classics in the Huangdi Neijing, Ling Shu and selected modern sources. Topics will include an introduction to the origin and development of the meridian system, introduction to the distribution and pathologies of the twelve regular meridians and eight extraordinary meridians; meridian gen-jie (root-branch), four seas, and six meridian diagnosis. Concurrent TCM101 (or prerequisite TCM111 and concurrent with TCM112), BMS197

BMS197. Western Anatomy & Physiology I (didactic) 4.5 credits. This foundational Western Medicine course provides a detailed study of the body’s skeletal and muscular systems, as well as, an introduction to basic biochemistry and cellular physiology as defined by allopathic medicine. Concurrent with BMS196 (for Dual Program)

CS109. Medical Mandarin I (didactic) 3 credits. An introduction to modern medical mandarin with a focus on grammar, character writing and character identification. Students will also learn how to use a Chinese language dictionary to look up commonly employed terms and characters, and are introduced to Chinese calligraphy. Prerequisite: none

CS159. Medical Mandarin II (didactic) 3 credits. A continuation of modern medical mandarin I with a focus on grammar, character writing and character identification. Students will also learn how to use a Chinese language dictionary to look up commonly employed terms and characters, and are introduced to Chinese calligraphy and classical medical writings. Prerequisite: CS109

PC106. Taiji Quan (practical) 2 credits. This practical course focuses on mastery of the twenty-four pose tai ji quan form. Prerequisite: none

TCM103. Chinese Nutrition – Nourishing Vitality Principles (didactic) 3 credits. This course offers discussion of nutrition and lifestyle from a TCM perspective. Daoist principles of food energetics, disease prevention, and living according to the seasons are central themes of this course. Constitution, environmental factors, and the properties and functions of whole foods are examined within the context of maintaining and restoring health. Prerequisite: none

TCM112. Foundations of TCM (lecture) 2 credits. More in-depth discussions and philosophical assignments on the fundamental TCM theories including: YinYang; Qi; five phases; six vital substances; meridian theory; classical Chinese physiology (zang xiang), causes of disease, etiology and pathomechanism and a basic overview of disease patterns. Discussion of these topics will include their classical and modern interpretations.

Total Credits, Term 2: 21.5

Year 1 January Intake Total Credits: 51.5
Year 1 January Intake Total Credit Hours: 772.5

Course Synopsis/Credits: Acupuncturist (3 years)

Course Descriptions


 
TCM Program TCM Program - Year 1 TCM Program - Year 2 TCM Program - Year 3 TCM Program - Year 4 TCM Program - Year 5
Acupuncturist Program Acupuncturist Program - Year 1 Acupuncturist Program - Year 2 Acupuncturist Program - Year 3    
TCM Herbalist Program TCM Herbalist Program - Year 1 TCM Herbalist Program - Year 2 TCM Herbalist Program - Year 3    
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